After a long hard day at work, I flicked on my television in the hopes of some mindless entertainment. A cheesy soap opera or some tacky reality TV programme, I was game for just about anything that would not require me to have to react. Instead, I was greeted by news of another round of anti-NKF sentiments. In my opinion, this whole NKF scandal has totally blown out of proportion and other legitimate charity organisations are suffering needlessly because of it.

I stopped my monthly contributions to the NKF some years back when I started to hear rumours of the exploitation of donations from some of my colleagues and friends. Sensing that something was amiss with the NKF, I decided to channel a substantial percentage of my monthly disposable income to the Community Chest instead. Ironically, when the NKF incident occurred, I made a decision to start contributing to them again.

Just as other donors were ceasing their contributions, I decided to pump mine back in. The beneficiaries should not be held responsible for the mistakes of those who manage the funds. My gut tells me that the public is still oblivious to the whole truth. So let us not be too hasty and make any moral judgments.

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At the moment, the need for transparency amongst charitable non-profit organisations is eminent. The general public has a right to know where and how all their hard earned money has been utilised. The NKF and other charities need to regain back the trust of their donors.

The statistics are staggering…. 90% of the world’s population are surviving on a mere 10% of the world’s resources and vice versa. Over half the people on our planet live in shantytowns without electricity or clean water.

The poor also do not have access to health care and continue to live on impoverished diets. It does not take a rocket scientist to deduce that only a small percentage of people get to enjoy the spoils of advancements in technology and the immense wealth of economical growth. Thus, the rich just keep getting richer, and the poor poorer.

As the age old adage goes, “It is in the giving that we receive.” Does it not feel good to have the means and the ability to give? Count your many blessings and not your shortcomings. Spare a thought for those around you who are less privileged than the rest of us. Send aid to the poor and help the handicapped. The beneficiaries of charitable organisations genuinely do need whatever assistance and support we can render.

Do not cast them aside or turn a deaf ear to their cause just because of the NKF saga. Let us overlook the NKF’s faux pas. Stop all the finger pointing and move on. Return back to society by either volunteerism or monetary methods. Ask yourselves when were the last time you went out of your way to do something for the less fortunate?